Mister Badger

An editor and writer who likes art, books, art books, comics, comic books, and artist's books. And literature and cats.
Marc Yankus, Commodore Criterion, 2013, color photograph. (Via)

Marc Yankus, Commodore Criterion, 2013, color photograph. (Via)

If you can’t submit to art, to hell with you.
—James Turrell

Deborah Kass, Quote Louis Bourgeois, 2005–2007, oil and acrylic on canvas, 96 x 84 inches.

Deborah Kass, Quote Louis Bourgeois, 2005–2007, oil and acrylic on canvas, 96 x 84 inches.

What’s stunning about Matt Kish’s illustrations for Heart of Darkness — one for every page of Joseph Conrad’s text — is how sunny they are. His modest palette comprises yellow, green, black, and white, with the occasional hit of red, orange, or blue. The novel, on the other hand, is tonally dark: sepulchral and miasmic. In his foreword to this new edition, recently published by Tin House, Kish explains that the choice of colors was his first decision and was informed by an early lesson that “it was folly to think that terrible things happen only in the dark.” To that end, Marlow’s journey into the shadowy, hallucinogenic heart of Africa is here cast under a sun that, as Kish puts it, shines “as brightly and hotly as it does on the happiest of days” (Much like Beckett’s ode to banality in opening to Murphy: “The sun shone, having no alternative, on the nothing new”).

Read more!
What’s stunning about Matt Kish’s illustrations for Heart of Darkness — one for every page of Joseph Conrad’s text — is how sunny they are. His modest palette comprises yellow, green, black, and white, with the occasional hit of red, orange, or blue. The novel, on the other hand, is tonally dark: sepulchral and miasmic. In his foreword to this new edition, recently published by Tin House, Kish explains that the choice of colors was his first decision and was informed by an early lesson that “it was folly to think that terrible things happen only in the dark.” To that end, Marlow’s journey into the shadowy, hallucinogenic heart of Africa is here cast under a sun that, as Kish puts it, shines “as brightly and hotly as it does on the happiest of days” (Much like Beckett’s ode to banality in opening to Murphy: “The sun shone, having no alternative, on the nothing new”).

Read more!

It was exactly a year ago that Sam Stephenson wrote to ask whether we might collaborate on a series of blog posts documenting the 2013 season at the Durham Bulls Athletic Park. Initially, I demurred. I’ve never had much interest in baseball, unless you count a short-lived crush on Chuck Knoblauch in the early aughts. But Sam also promised images by a roster of photographers, and I was won over.

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There’s a foreign legion of women, too. But we have no uniforms—no flags—and no medals when we are brave.
—Marlene Dietrich, Morocco

On the title-page spread of Julia Gfrörer’s new book Black Is the Color, long, curving strands of line emerge thickly from the bottom of the left page and ramble up and across the facing page. Some strands disappear off the edge of the book; others wander toward the top, like vines reaching for sunlight, finding their terminus midway up the page. The fine, sinuous lines easily resemble waves of hair—many of Gfrörer’s female characters possess fluid tresses—but they also take on the appearance of waterways, as seen from above: the oxbows and meanders formed by a river’s patient flow, or the fingered currents of river sediment as it spills into the sea.
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On the title-page spread of Julia Gfrörer’s new book Black Is the Color, long, curving strands of line emerge thickly from the bottom of the left page and ramble up and across the facing page. Some strands disappear off the edge of the book; others wander toward the top, like vines reaching for sunlight, finding their terminus midway up the page. The fine, sinuous lines easily resemble waves of hair—many of Gfrörer’s female characters possess fluid tresses—but they also take on the appearance of waterways, as seen from above: the oxbows and meanders formed by a river’s patient flow, or the fingered currents of river sediment as it spills into the sea.

Read more!

An Edward Gorey cover illustration.

An Edward Gorey cover illustration.

Chloe Piene, Untitled (Chloe Naked with Baby), 1999, charcoal on paper.

Chloe Piene, Untitled (Chloe Naked with Baby), 1999, charcoal on paper.

Jan Toorop, The Sphinx (The souls around the Sphinx), 1892–97, black and colored chalk on canvas.

Jan Toorop, The Sphinx (The souls around the Sphinx), 1892–97, black and colored chalk on canvas.